1864

May 13, 1864 - About two miles from Resaca

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH GEORGIA CAVALRY
May 13, 1864

The enemy occupied the bridge on opposite side of the river, and seem to be planting a battery in a position which will command my line on the river. Should they do this I will be able to hold but a small portion of the river around for a considerable distance. If we had artillery here they might be driven from their position probably.

J. R. HART
Colonel

Cassualties reported:

13-Resaca, GA U.S.A.- 600 Killed,2147 Wounded
C.S.A.- 300 Killed,1500 Wounded
1000 Missing or Captured
Bri.Gen. Wadkins Killed


July 03, 1864 -

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, THIRD DIV., 15TH ARMY CORPS

Resaca, Ga., July 3, 1864
Captain C. L. WHITE,
Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have information that Colonel Hart, Sixth Georgia Cavalry, with 300 men, is encamped near Jasper in Pickens, where he is gathering up and feeding stock. I think that the force might be captured by sending a detachment of cavalry from Kingston to seize the mountain gaps south and east of Jasper, while an attack is made from the north by a cavalry force sent from here. Colonel Croxton, Fourth Kentucky Mounted Infantry, and Colonel Baldwin, Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, called on me this morning; their regiments, with a detachment of the Third Kentucky Cavalry, number, say 1,100 or 1,200 men. Croxton and Baldwin are both intelligent men, and if your order the movement I have no doubt they will execute it vigorously. Do you propose to enter upon the immediate execution of General Steedman's order banishing citizens from the line of the railroad? If so copies should be distributed along the line. I have seen one copy, but have none.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GREEN B. RAUM


July 05, 1864 -


ROME, July 5, 1864


Brigadier General J. E. SMITH:

A rebel soldier captured reports that Friday morning fifty of Wheeler's cavalry scouts left Cedartown destined to the railroad near Calhoun or Resaca; expects to form a junction with Hart's (Sixth Georgia) cavalry. He says this force is prepared with torpedoes to blow up trains; he reports also that Pillow is to act in concert with an additional force. This statement has come to me through two sources.

WM. VANDEVER,
Brigadier-General.


RESACA, GA., July 5, 1864

Captain C. L. WHITE,
Assistant Adjutant-General:

A dispatch from Colonel Laiboldt (Dalton) says 100 or 200 rebel cavalry are scouting above here, east of the railroad, three miles south of this place. I have ordered Colonel Murray to send a strong force in the direction of Spring Place to try to intercept them. I think the force reported by General Vandever passed Villanow Sunday night and tore up the track south of Tunnel Hill. They may have formed a junction with the Sixth Georgia Cavalry, and comprise the force Colonel Laiboldt speaks of. I think half a regiment should be placed between Calhoun and Adairsville.

GREEN B. RAUM,
Colonel, Commanding Brigade  
HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,


Kingston, Ga., July 5, 1864

Brigadier General WILLIAM VANDEVER,

Rome, Ga.:

Do you know of any crossing on the Etowah between my outposts, three miles below here, and Rome? I have no cavalry here, and as yet have had but little time to explore the country adjoining my line. At last account Hart (Sixth Georgia) was at Jasper.

JNO. E. SMITH,
Brigadier-General


August 15, 1864 -

Major- General, Commanding
RESACA, August 15, 1864- 7 p. m

General SHERMAN:
The force which crossed last evening below Field's Mill was 2,000 strong, under General Martin, composed of the First, Third, Fourth, and Sixth Georgia Cavalry, a Mississippi regiment, and some Alabama cavalry. This force destroyed the railroad near Tilton. The force which crossed at the same time at Field's Mill is estimated at 1,000. They had four pieces of artillery. Wheeler was with the column which passed up yesterday morning by Oldtown. Their horses considerably jaded. I think all are north of the river. Some soldiers told their friends Wheeler would go to East Tennessee.

G. B. RAUM,
Colonel, Commanding Brigade

August 19, 1864 - Skirmishes near Sweet Water


LOUDON, TENN., August 24, 1864

Major-General STEEDMAN

GENERAL: I have the honor to make you acquainted with the following account of the proceedings of the raiding party from the south, in this vicinity for your information:

On Saturday last a detachment from this place had a skirmish with the enemy near Sweet Water early in the morning, and finding their strength too great fell back. In the afternoon, near Philadelphia, had another skirmish, and 3 men captured, 1 of whom made his escape, but no one killed or wounded. The loss of the enemy in killed and wounded in these two skirmishes was 6 or more. We captured 1 from the Sixth Georgia Cavalry. That day the enemy moved to the south of this place and crossed the Little Tennessee at different fords the 20th and 21st. The 22nd some crossed the Holston at Louisville and cut the telegraph at Concord, and did a little damage to railroad, and then returned to the south side of the river the next day. Railroad and telegraph to Knoxville now repaired. I inclose copies of telegrams from General Tillson, which will inform you of the subsequent movements of the enemy. The railroad and telegraph between Philadelphia and Athens are badly injured. the construction train is here, and will proceed at once to repair the road and telegraph as rapidly as possible. There is no injury to either between Loudon and Philadelphia. The country has been thoroughly scattered, and we fell assured that they have all crossed to the other side of the Little Tennessee River. I felt confident of being able to defend the place and protect the bridge, but had not force to attack the enemy in the field. Loudon and Kingston were not molested. General Tillson is at Knoxville, and as the place is very strongly fortified there is no cause of fear. I return this p. m. to Knoxville, having made arrangements here for the safety of bridge, &c. Shall spare no effort for the security of the garrisons, &c., under my command, and shall use every endeavor to harass and defeat the enemy. Captain W. W. Cushing, military conductor, is just in from Charleston; reports no rebels, but road very much destroyed between Athens and Charleston.

I am, general, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. AMMEN,

Brigadier General, U. S. Vols., Commanding Fourth Division, 23rd Army Corps